Nba_Live_99-frontNBA Jam proved to be the most popular NBA video game at the beginning of the 1990s. While the game took over the arcades in 1993 and then hit the home gaming market in 1994, it started to falter and eventually folded for years at a time. This is mostly because EA developed NBA Live in 1995 as gamers wanted a more realistic video game system. This eventually went in direct competition with NBA 2K when the Sega version hit stores in 1999, but both games are still out.

EA Sport’s NBA Live first hit the shelves in 1995 as it took over for EA’s previous basketball games NBA Playoff and NBA Showdown. These two video games focused only on the playoffs, where players would essentially be placed in sudden death games as soon as they started up the game. This proved necessary as video game systems did not have the capability of handling long seasons, especially when saving games. However, by 1994, EA Sports released NBA Live 95 for the first year.

EA Continued to sell the game every year until 2010 as its sales started to sink against the NBA 2K franchise. Due to this, EA decided to try and alter the game to bring in more players with the release of NBA Elite 11. The desire to release the game with new ports and playing features ended up shelving the game for three years, so EA did not release another version of NBA Live until NBA Live 14 in the winter of 2013.

The NBA Live gaming system did alter gameplay in ways players had never seen before. With the release of NBA Live 2005, the game brought in the NBA All-Star Weekend, including the Rookie Challenge, Slam Dunk Contest, 3 Point Shootout and other features. Then in the 08 version, the game brought in some international teams in order to compete in a world competition mode. NBA Live 09 added “Dynamic DNA”, which altered player tendencies every single game, making some players go on shooting streaks and cold slumps, which proved to be one of the most innovative additions to any sporting simulator.